Tag: may

May New Releases Part 1

The Surface BreaksThe Surface Breaks

by 

Louise O’Neill

Deep beneath the sea, off the cold Irish coast, Gaia is a young mermaid who dreams of freedom from her controlling father. On her first swim to the surface, she is drawn towards a human boy. She longs to join his carefree world, but how much will she have to sacrifice? What will it take for the little mermaid to find her voice? Hans Christian Andersen’s original fairy tale is reimagined through a searing feminist lens, with the stunning, scalpel-sharp writing and world building that has won Louise her legions of devoted fans. A book with the darkest of undercurrents, full of rage and rallying cries: storytelling at its most spellbinding.

Released May 3rd

The World of All Souls: A Complete Guide to A Discovery of Witches, Shadow of Night, and the Book of LifeThe World of All Souls: A Complete Guide to A Discovery of Witches, Shadow of Night, and the Book of Life (All Souls Trilogy Companion)

by 

Deborah Harkness

A fully illustrated guide to Deborah Harkness’s #1 New York Times bestselling All Souls trilogy–“an irresistible . . . wonderfully imaginative grown-up fantasy” (People)

A Discovery of Witches introduced Diana Bishop, Oxford scholar and reluctant witch, and vampire geneticist Matthew Clairmont. Shadow of Night and The Book of Life carried Deborah Harkness’s series to its spellbinding conclusion.

In The World of All Souls, Harkness shares the rich sources of inspiration behind her bewitching novels. She draws together synopses, character bios, maps, recipes, and even the science behind creatures, magic, and alchemy–all with her signature historian’s touch. Bursting with fascinating facts and dazzling artwork, this essential handbook is a must-have for longtime fans and eager newcomers alike.

Released May 8th

Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape CultureNot That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

by 

Roxane Gay

Edited and with an introduction by Roxane Gay, the New York Times bestselling and deeply beloved author of Bad Feminist and Hunger, this anthology of first-person essays tackles rape, assault, and harassment head-on.

Vogue, “10 of the Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018” *Harper’s Bazaar, “10 New Books to Add to Your Reading List in 2018” * Elle, “21 Books We’re Most Excited to Read in 2018” * Boston Globe, “25 books we can’t wait to read in 2018” *Huffington Post, “60 Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2018” * Hello Giggles, “19 Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2018” * Buzzfeed, “33 Most Exciting New Books of 2018″

In this valuable and revealing anthology, cultural critic and bestselling author Roxane Gay collects original and previously published pieces that address what it means to live in a world where women have to measure the harassment, violence, and aggression they face, and where they are “routinely second-guessed, blown off, discredited, denigrated, besmirched, belittled, patronized, mocked, shamed, gaslit, insulted, bullied” for speaking out. Contributions include essays from established and up-and-coming writers, performers, and critics, including actors Ally Sheedy and Gabrielle Union and writers Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz, and Claire Schwartz. Covering a wide range of topics and experiences, from an exploration of the rape epidemic embedded in the refugee crisis to first-person accounts of child molestation, this collection is often deeply personal and is always unflinchingly honest. Like Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to MeNot That Bad will resonate with every reader, saying “something in totality that we cannot say alone.”

Searing and heartbreakingly candid, this provocative collection both reflects the world we live in and offers a call to arms insisting that “not that bad” must no longer be good enough.

Released May 1st

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The PiscesThe Pisces

by 

Melissa Broder

An original, imaginative, and hilarious debut novel about love, anxiety, and sea creatures, from the author of So Sad Today

Lucy has been writing her dissertation about Sappho for thirteen years when she and Jamie break up. After she hits rock bottom in Phoenix, her Los Angeles-based sister insists Lucy housesit for the summer—her only tasks caring for a beloved diabetic dog and trying to learn to care for herself. Annika’s home is a gorgeous glass cube atop Venice Beach, but Lucy can find no peace from her misery and anxiety—not in her love addiction group therapy meetings, not in frequent Tinder meetups, not in Dominic the foxhound’s easy affection, not in ruminating on the ancient Greeks. Yet everything changes when Lucy becomes entranced by an eerily attractive swimmer one night while sitting alone on the beach rocks.

Whip-smart, neurotically funny, sexy, and above all, fearless, The Pisces is built on a premise both sirenic and incredibly real—what happens when you think love will save you but are afraid it might also kill you.

Released May 1st

The Mars RoomThe Mars Room

by 

Rachel Kushner

It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.

Released May 1st

Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo”

by 

Zora Neale Hurston

A major literary event: a never-before-published work from the author of the American classic, Their Eyes Were Watching Godwhich brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of the last known survivor of the Atlantic slave trade—illegally smuggled from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the United States.

In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, to interview ninety-five-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.

In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilde, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.

Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon brilliantly illuminates the tragedy of slavery and one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

Released May 8th

Furyborn (Empirium, #1)Furyborn (Empirium #1)

by

Claire Legrand

Follows two fiercely independent young women, centuries apart, who hold the power to save their world…or doom it.

When assassins ambush her best friend, the crown prince, Rielle Dardenne risks everything to save him, exposing her ability to perform all seven kinds of elemental magic. The only people who should possess this extraordinary power are a pair of prophesied queens: a queen of light and salvation and a queen of blood and destruction. To prove she is the Sun Queen, Rielle must endure seven trials to test her magic. If she fails, she will be executed…unless the trials kill her first.

A thousand years later, the legend of Queen Rielle is a mere fairy tale to bounty hunter Eliana Ferracora. When the Undying Empire conquered her kingdom, she embraced violence to keep her family alive. Now, she believes herself untouchable–until her mother vanishes without a trace, along with countless other women in their city. To find her, Eliana joins a rebel captain on a dangerous mission and discovers that the evil at the heart of the empire is more terrible than she ever imagined.

As Rielle and Eliana fight in a cosmic war that spans millennia, their stories intersect, and the shocking connections between them ultimately determine the fate of their world–and of each other.

Released May 22nd


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May Wrap-Up

It’s monthly wrap-up time again folks!! Hope you all had a good reading month. I had a pretty good one, got about 10 books in and enjoyed them all.

Unmasqued Unmasqued by Collete Gale ★★★★☆

(FYI this is a durrrty book) Retelling of The Phantom of the Opera. So much better than I was expecting, this one is for everyone who wanted the phantom to get the girl.

Master of Seduction (Sea Wolves, #1) Master of Seduction by Kinley MacGregor ★★★☆☆

I wanted so much more from this book. I expected it to be a cheesy and silly as the cover but it was a bit….boring.

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (Dirk Gently, #1) Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams ★★★★☆

So witty and mental and fun to read! I didn’t enjoy it as much as Hitchhikers Guide but it was still great.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) The Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling ★★★★★

My favourite one!!! A lot of people dislike this one because of teenage angst but I think it’s well founded. Love it!

Hard Bitten (Chicagoland Vampires, #4) Hard Bitten by Chloe Neill ★★★★★

Awesome urban fantasy series. Merit kicks ass!!

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #1) Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs ★★★☆☆

Interesting but not really for me.

Drink Deep (Chicagoland Vampires, #5) Drink Deep by Chloe Neill ★★★★★

That UF series again. This one is my favourite so far. Merit really comes into her own here and the world gets so much bigger.

The Greyfriar (Vampire Empire, #1) The Greyfriar by Clay & Susan Griffith ★★★★☆

Steampunk vampire apocalypse, you say? Hell yes!! Very heavy with the world building at the beginning but awesome story.

Zombie's Bite (Dorina Basarab, #0.1) Zombie’s Bite by Karen Chance ★★★★☆

Prequel novella to Chance’s Dorina Basarab series, available for free from her site. It’s set before the series but I wouldn’t recommend reading it before Midnight’s Daughter.

Bossypants Bossypants by Tina Fey ★★★☆☆

I thought this would be a lot funnier. It was very interesting though.

The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood ★★★★★

Harrowing. Everyone should read this.

Curse the Dawn (Cassandra Palmer, #4) Curse the Dawn by Karen Chance ★★★★★

There are only two book worlds I would like to live in and they are Harry Potter (obv) and this series. I love it!!!!!!!!!!!


Had one DNF this month and that was…..

Midnight Crossroad (Midnight, Texas #1) Midnight Crossroad by Charlaine Harris

100 pages in and zzzzz boring. I’ll check out the show when it comes out.

May Reading Challenge Update

Beltaine

Beltaine is the anglicised name for the Gaelic May Day festival. Most commonly it is held on 1 May, or about halfway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. Beltaine signifies the beginning of summer.

description1. Its name appears to derive from the Old Irish words Bel taine meaning ‘bright fire’. Bonfires played an important part in the activities and were often lit on prominent local landmarks.
Read a book with a character with fire magic, or with fire/red/orange on the cover, or where there is a fire.

description2. Witches and the fairies were also believed to be unusually active during this period and a number of actions could be taken to protect your home and especially your livestock. Milk could be poured across the threshold of the house or byre to prevent entry by the ‘wee folk’ or more gruesomely the cattle could be driven to the nearest ringfort or “fairyfort” and some of their blood spilt on the ground to appease the spirits.
Read a book with a witch/wizard, or a book with fae characters, or where a character preforms a ritual of some form (ritaul is open to your own interpretation).

description3. May flowers, such as primrose, gorse or hawthorn blossoms, were gathered before dawn and placed in bundles on door posts to ward off evil. Similarly sprigs of rowan or hawthorn could be placed over the byre door or even across the horns of the cows to prevent ‘milk thieves’, the prevalent belief being that someone could steal your summer’s milk supplies through the incantation of specific curses.
Read a book with flowers on the cover, or a cover you think is pretty, or where a character casts a curse.

description4.‘May bushes’were also erected in farm yards and around villages. These normally consisted of hawthorn branches that had been driven into the ground and then decorated with rags and other items.
Read a book where someone decorates, or where the characters live in or visit a village, or with trees or foliage on the cover.

description5. Some traditions also surrounded human fertility, such as the creation of May babies. In this curious custom a figure of a female (the May baby) was placed on a pole and then covered in flowers, ribbons and straw. A man and a woman, also dressed up in costume, would then dance around the figure and make vulgar displays to the on watching crowd. It was believed that attending this spectacle would help people trying to conceive.
Read a book where someone gets laid, or has kids/is pregnant, or where characters attend an event.

description6. Beltane celebrations had largely died out by the mid-20th century, although some of its customs continued and in some places it has been revived as a cultural event. Since the late 20th century, Celtic neopagans and Wiccans have observed Beltane, or something based on it, as a religious holiday. Neopagans in the Southern Hemisphere often celebrate Beltane at the other end of the year (around 1 November).
Read a book set in summer or winter, or set/published in the 20th century, or with a title/character name that begins with any letter in BELTAINE.

description

My Challenge

1.
Read a book where there is a fire. Unmasqued 1/5/17

2.
Read a book with a witch/wizard. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix 10/5/17

3.
Read a book with a cover you think is pretty. Hard Bitten 11/5/17

4.
Read a book with trees or foliage on the cover. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 15/5/17

5.
Read a book where someone gets laid. Master of Seduction 4/5/17

6.
Read a book set in summer or winter, or set/published in the 20th century. Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency 9/5/17

Unmasqued by Colette Gale Master of Seduction (Sea Wolves, #1) by Kinley MacGregor Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (Dirk Gently #1) by Douglas Adams Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) by J.K. Rowling Hard Bitten (Chicagoland Vampires, #4) by Chloe Neill Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #1) by Ransom Riggs