Tag: literary articles

Literary Article Round-Up

From Ideation to Revision: Margaret George’s Writing Advice

Every writer is asked, “Where do you get your ideas?” Writers create people and worlds in a way that hints of magic, making things seemingly real that didn’t exist before. This mystery intrigues readers, who enjoy the final result but wonder how it came about. –  MARGARET GEORGE, Signature

A Reader’s Guide to the Works of Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami is a difficult writer to characterize. Broadly, his style falls under magical realism with an occasional absurdist streak. His writing is simple yet dense, filled with lush imagery, richly drawn characters, and a deep well of underlying emotion. –  KEITH RICE, Signature

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This Woman Opened a Bookstore and Drove It Across the Country

Do you love reading so much you’d like to bring books to people all over the country? That’s just what Rita Collins has done with her mobile bookshop, Saint Rita’s Amazing Traveling Bookstore and Textual Apothecary, a white van full of books that has traveled around the country multiple times. – G.G. Andrew, Bookbub

John Boyne Explores the Dark Side of Literary Ambition

A Ladder to the Sky

Graham Greene wrote that “there is a splinter of ice in the heart of a writer.” By that measure, the novelist antihero of John Boyne’s gripping new book, A Ladder to the Sky, must have an entire ice rink at his core.

Maurice Swift is gorgeous, charming, and hell-bent on literary fame. His only problem? He can’t think of a thing to write about. After beguiling aging German novelist Erich Ackermann, however, Swift extracts from Ackermann a devastating wartime confession of love and betrayal. He steals it for his own bestselling debut, ruining what’s left of Ackermann’s life. Soon it’s clear that “literary larceny” is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Swift’s dark ambition. – Goodreads

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5 Classic Books That Are Ripe for a Retelling

Before I began writing The Winters, my modern response to Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, the first thing I did was Google whether another writer had already taken a stab. Turns out there are a few Rebecca retellings, including at least two sequels, one sanctioned by the estate called Rebecca’s Tale by Sally Beauman. – LISA GABRIELE, Signature

Stephen King Sells Film Rights to Teens for One Dollar

Talk about encouraging young artists: Stephen King just sold the film rights to his short story “Stationary Bike” (from the Just After Sunset collection) to a couple of teenagers for just one dollar. This is part of a program on King’s website called “Dollar Babies,” which offers up some of his smaller and less popular works to aspiring filmmakers, including stories from older collections like Night Shift and Skeleton Crew. You never know which of these dollar deals could end up making a splash on the festival circuit, potentially making someone’s career. So dive in, auteurs! As The AV Club points out reassuringly, “Nothing you make will be as bad as the Dark Tower movie.” – TOM BLUNT, Signature

4 Interesting Articles from the Booksphere

Before we get into today’s Article Round-Up I wanted to mention a new offer from Audible that’s available until December 14th. At the moment you can join Audible for £3.99/month for the first four months instead of the usual £7.99/month.

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Here are some interesting articles I read this month about books and reading. I especially enjoyed Bookbub’s Little Fires Everywhere book club kit and the article from Medium on the joys of rereading.

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There’s a Limit to Writing What You Know, and Here’s Why

“Write what you know;” it’s a familiar refrain and popular advice given to aspiring writers. But even that can be fraught with difficulty. In writing characters, places, and events from our own lives, we can all too easily fall into the trap of sharing too much detail.” – Elyssa Friedland, Signature

12 Things Readers Really Want Nonreaders to Know

“Every reader has friends or family members who just don’t get it. “Why do you read so much?” they might ask, staring at your overflowing bookshelves or your Reading Challenge on Goodreads. “I haven’t read an entire book in years.”

Oh, those poor, unfortunate souls… ” –Hayley, Goodreads

The Joys of Rereading

“I have devoted my life to reading, and I spend a good portion of that life reading things I’ve already read. Not everyone understands this, and not everyone feels this impulse to begin again. The act of reading is inherently progressive: It tends forward, toward the future, letter after letter, word after word, sentence after sentence, page after page. Rereading is a doubling; every movement forward is also a repetition, an echoing, a recalling.” – Gavin Paul, Medium

Book Club Kit: ‘Little Fires Everywhere’ by Celeste Ng

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If your book club is looking for a thought-provoking and captivating novel, we recommend Celeste Ng‘s Little Fires EverywhereWe’ve rounded up everything you need to host a successful book club, including: 

☐ An overview of what to expect from Little Fires Everywhere

☐ Recommendations from other bookworms

☐ Book club discussion questions

☐ Hosting inspiration (including a link to the author’s playlist!)” – Kristina Writght, Bookbub


What interesting articles have you read recently about books and reading?

Audible Black Friday 2018 Offer

5 Great Articles from the Booksphere

Shelf-Discipline: How to Read More Before Your Next Book Spree

“At Goodreads, we always encourage our members to read more. But sometimes, the number of books still waiting on your Want to Read shelf can feel a little daunting… So we asked avid readers on Facebook and Twitter if they’ve ever tried a book-buying hiatus: a temporary (and we stress temporary), self-imposed ban from buying more books until they finish the current ones on their to-read list. Needless to say, some reactions were (understandably) strong… ” – Marie, Goodreads

10 Inspiring New Memoirs by Women Hitting Shelves This Fall

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“With the arrival of fall comes a feeling of renewal and self-invention. If you’re looking for inspiration this coming season, we recommend picking up these powerful memoirs written by tenacious and talented women. Check out this list of new inspiring memoirs by women below.” – Ashley Johnson for Bookbub

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9 of the Trickiest Riddles from Books

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“Riddles are a time-honored rite of passage for book heroes. As readers, we love how they test the hero’s powers of perception, thinking, and creativity — and how they test ours, too! Feel like a bit of a brain teaser? Try your wits against these tricky riddles from books and see if you have what it takes to be a bookish hero. Scroll to the end to find the answers — but no peeking!” – Elisabeth Delp, Bookbub

7 Novels That Will Take You Back to the 1980s

“If you’re aching for the ‘80s you can always revisit these classic books, but hindsight can be 20/20, and there is something fun about journeying back through a more contemporary read. Here are a few newer titles that will satisfy your nostalgia needs.” – Ashley Morten, Signature

9 Best Fiction Books About Films

“Evoking one artistic discipline while using an entirely different one is no easy task. Yet for as long as moving pictures have captivated audiences, they’ve also captivated a certain group of writers, who’ve viewed the existence of cinema as an implicit challenge. Namely, how does one capture the essence of a film using only words on a page?” – Tobias Carrol, Signature


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5 Interesting Articles from the Booksphere

It’s almost as enjoyable to read about books as it is to read books (almost). Here are some interesting articles I read during the month about the books and reading. The article from Goodreads about killing the ‘dead girl’ in crime is particularly interesting and Signature’s article on haunted houses in literature has some great books for Autumn.

Elaine Howlin Book Blog Review

Book Bloggers Are Real Readers

Bloggers do it for their love of books. No agendas, no bias and no pay. If  bestselling authors can see the benefit, why can some readers not?

“On Saturday, February 4th, Chocolat author Joanne Harris started a hashtag on Twitter: #tentweetsaboutbookbloggers highlighted some of the misconceptions that surround the world of book blogging and online reviews.” – Margaret Madden, The Irish Times

Killing the ‘Dead Girl’ Theme in Crime Fiction

dead girls

“It’s long been my observation that a lot of crime writing, even very good crime writing, can be summed up this way: a beautiful girl dies, and a man feels bad about it. Maybe he’s a mourning husband/father/brother/lover. Maybe he’s falsely accused. Maybe he did it, but he has, you know, REASONS. And now we’re seeing more and more female writers asserting for their ownership of crime fiction, and it’s very exciting. ” – Cybil, Goodreads

The Future Isn’t Female—It’s Feminine

women power

“How is feminine different? Because as with all labels, categorizations divide us. Evolving means being all-encompassing rather than exclusive. Men are just as capable of being feminine as females are. Therefore, this change isn’t solely to be championed by females. But championed by those in tune with and embracing all things feminine. A balanced approach to both masculine and feminine energy. Not one or the other. Remember from the Goddess Manifesto: Unity is a source of our power.” – Emma Mildon, Tips on Life & Love

Beyond Haunted House: Fictional Houses in Novels that Jump off the Page

“Whether English country houses, Gothic Manors, or simply the classic haunted houses, writers have long had a fascination with making homes the centerpiece of stories. Some are so memorable and integral to the narrative as to essentially become characters themselves. They stick with us, captivate and terrify us, and provide a level of metaphorical depth that lifts a novel to another level. From horror and suspense to literary fiction and everything in between, these are few of my favorite houses in literature.” – Keith Rice, Signature

Everything We Know About the ‘Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine’ Movie

“With Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine, Witherspoon adds another female-authored debut novel to her list of book club picks. The book stars Eleanor, a lonely 30-year-old who spends her weekends nursing a bottle of vodka and a pop-star obsession. Throughout the novel we see Eleanor slowly widen her circle of interaction, both intentionally and unintentionally. However, Honeyman didn’t want Eleanor to be portrayed as a victim. The result is a humorous, yet thought-provoking story.” – Vicki Lindern, Bookbub


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