Interesting Articles

Same, but Different: Why We Love Revisiting Famous Literary Characters

I recently watched a brand-new dramatization of a classic work of literature — if, that is, the definition of literature includes manga.

The work in question is Hana Yori Dango, usually translated into English as Boys Over Flowers, the all-time most popular shōjo manga, i.e., manga aimed at a teenage female readership. It ran for twelve years in a biweekly magazine and was collected in thirty-seven volumes, which have sold more than sixty million copies. – SHERRY THOMAS, Signature

Cărturești Carusel Bookstore

This wonderful building was built in 1903 by a wealthy family of Greek bankers, only to be confiscated by the Communist regime in the 1950s. It was turned into a general store and later abandoned and left to decay as Communism collapsed. – Atlas Obscura

Audible Black Friday 2018 Offer

Awards Introduction: 6 Literary Prizes and a Few Winning Books We Love

Image result for books unsplash

Earlier this year the Nobel Prize Committee announced it wouldn’t be awarding a prize for literature this year due to an internal sex scandal within the Swedish Academy, which oversees the prize. So readers who look forward each October to discovering new international writers – or cheering for the victory of a beloved favorite – will have to wait a year, until fall 2019, to find out who the winner is. The Academy plans to award two prizes next year. (While you wait, though, consider the book by the winner of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, Nadia Murad’s The Last Girl.)  In the meantime, there are plenty of other literary contests to watch (or, in the case of a rich award like the Man Booker, bet on.) Read on to get a sense of what the prizes are and who’s won in the past. –  JENNIE YABROFF, Signature

In Perfect Harmony: Why Music and Fiction Work Well Together

There is an inherent problem about writing fiction that concerns another art form – especially if you’re claiming that your fictional artist has real talent, or is exceptionally good at what he or she does.  How can you prove it? It’s not so hard if you’re writing about a writer – the qualities and textures of the prose that you, the author, employ will almost do the job for you. The examples you cite about the fictional author will surely reflect your own standards. This perhaps explains why there are more novels about novelists than any of the other potential artists and art forms on offer. How do you prove that your fictional painter, dancer, sculptor, composer, filmmaker are worthwhile, genuinely gifted? It’s tricky. – WILLIAM BOYD, Signature

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